University of Utah
School and Society
Spring 2003
ECS 4111 (001)
Prof: Audrey Thompson
TA: Amadou Niang
Class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:25 - 1:45 p.m.
Lecture meets in 116 BEH - S on Tues. & Th. 12:25 - 1:15 p.m.
Discussion sections meet Tues. & Th. 1:20 - 1:45 p.m. in
110 and 116 BEH-S
Amadou’s discussion group meets in 116 BEH-S
Audrey’s discussion group meets in 110 BEH-S

Office Information


Audrey’s Office: 308C M.B.H.
Off. hrs: Tu 10:30-12:00, Th 2:00-3:30, & by appt.
Voicemail: (801) 587-7803
Fax: (801) 587-7801
email:
web: http://www.pauahtun.org/audrey.html
Amadou’s Office: 304 M.B.H.
Off. hrs: Tu 2:00-3:30, Th 10:30-12:00, & by appt.
Phone: 587-7820 or 587-7821
Fax: (801) 587-7801
email:
Leave messages at 587-7814
Receptionist: Jay (801) 587-7814
All mailboxes: 307 M.B.H.

Purpose of the Course

School and Society focuses on the interlocking relations that schools have with other social institutions. While the course takes up topics such as pedagogy and curriculum, it considers these in light of the social context of education — for example, we look at the historical and contemporary pressures on schools and the resulting institutional conditions that help shape the meanings teachers and students can make of particular pedagogical approaches. Drawing upon history, sociology, philosophy, cultural anthropology and other research in the social and cultural foundations of education, the course takes up questions such as the following:

1. What are the purposes of education in a democracy?
2. What are the kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing that students, teachers, and citizens need to have? How do they arrive at these kinds of knowledge?
3. What sort of expectations can individuals and groups legitimately have of the schools? What demands can they legitimately make?
4. How should we understand teaching as a profession? What are teachers’ responsibilities to communities, individuals, institutions — and to their own professional knowledge? What is their sphere of autonomy, and what is their claim to decision-making power?
 


Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation;
2. required readings as assigned in the syllabus;
3. written homework and articles assigned in your discussion group; all written assignments assigned in advance (i.e. not including in-class assignments) must be typed and must be turned in on time;
4. unannounced quizzes and process writing exercises assigned in lecture; no make-up work will be allowed for missed or failed in-class written work — however, students may choose to drop their two worst grades for any missed or failed in-class written exercises. Please note that this includes writing activities missed due to illness;
5. a midterm paper (approx. 5-7 pp., typed, double-spaced) that draws upon course lectures, readings, and discussions (topics to be assigned); and
6. a final paper (approx. 7-10 pp., typed, double-spaced) that draws upon course lectures, readings, and discussions (topics to be assigned)

Note: Students attending fewer than 75% of the lectures and discussion meetings will not pass the course. Attending only lecture or only discussion section counts as 50% attendance. Adequate performance on reading and written assignments, regular attendance and class participation are minimal requirements for passing the course; excellent work is required for the higher grades. Written work must demonstrate understanding of the arguments and counter-arguments raised in the texts, lectures, and discussions, as well as the student’s own critical/appreciative response to the issues.

This is a writing emphasis course. The take-home written work that students will be assigned may include some or all of the following: 1) weekly or bi-weekly: short analyses of reading assignments, position papers, comparison/contrast exercises, identification of a paper’s argument and its foil(s), discussion questions, summaries, and/or journal entries, 2) a take-home midterm essay, and 3) a take-home final paper. In addition, students will be given regular in-class written assignments, including quizzes and process-writing exercises.

The University of Utah and the Department of Education, Culture, and Society seek to provide equal access to their programs, services, and activities for people with disabilities. Reasonable prior notice is needed in order to arrange accommodations.

Grading

Grading of pre-assigned written work will be rigorous, but there will be opportunities for rewrites on the midterm and (in some cases) on weekly, out-of-class written assignments.
 

Chauvinist paper, Biography papers, Biography Project, Quizzes, and in-class process writing: 25%
Participation, attendance, & short papers assigned in discussion group: 25%
Midterm paper: 25%
Final paper: 25%

— All pre-assigned (as opposed to in-class) written work is to be typed. It must be turned in on time.

— Your written (and spoken) contributions should demonstrate that you have read and understood the readings; they are not expected to give an exhaustive summary of the readings, but should bring to bear whatever is relevant in the readings to the topic or question assigned.

— Feel free to study with other students and to work out ideas together, but your phrasing in your written work should be your own. Your papers should demonstrate a distinctive working-through of the material, rather than a mere paraphrasing of the author(s)’s (or anyone else’s) work.

— We expect that you will have proofread your pre-assigned papers for spelling, punctuation, grammar, and usage. When explicit instruction has been given on particular issues of usage or spelling or grammar (whether in lecture, in discussion, or in comments on your papers), you will be held responsible for that information in your writing.

— All quoted material must be identified by quotation marks and by the author’s or authors’ name and a page number. Failure to identify quoted material as quoted material is plagiarism and is a very serious scholarly offense, subject to institutional sanctions. Beware of paraphrasing too closely — don’t just change a word here and there, for example, as this is still considered plagiarism. When in doubt, quote the text exactly and put the material in quotes. Some degree of quotation is often helpful in making your claims specific, but do not rely too heavily on the author’s own phrasing; we are not looking for a “digest” version of the articles. It is usually best to be able to summarize an author’s position in your own words. It is helpful to give page numbers for claims about an author’s position even if you are putting the claim in your own words.

You are not required to use any formal system of citation in the course; it is sufficient to indicate the source by author and page number in parentheses, if it is a course reading (e.g. Rose, p. 112). You are welcome to use outside materials in addition to course readings (although not instead of them); if you do refer to or quote outside readings, you should provide a full reference (author, title, date, place, and publisher; also, the edition or volume number, if applicable). Even in the latter case, it is not necessary to use a formal citation system, but if you expect to do further work in which you will use citations (such as a master’s thesis or an article to be submitted for publication), then we encourage you to familiarize yourself with and to use the citation system preferred in your area. (For example, educational psychologists prefer APA style, educational historians tend to prefer Chicago style, and research on children’s literature often uses MLA style or Turabian. Check the scholarly journals in your field.) You will not be graded on this, but it is helpful to get enough practice at using such systems that they become second-nature.

Class participation involves attentive listening not only to the discussion leader but to fellow students; spoken contributions to discussion that are informed by the readings, films, lectures, and class discussion itself; regular attendance; useful contributions to small group work; and a willingness to engage and draw out other students. Students are welcome to contribute personal stories that speak to the issues raised in the class but need to be careful not to treat the classroom as a stage; instead, the telling of stories should be an invitation to a conversation through which all students (including the original storyteller) can learn. Be prepared to be challenged and be willing to rethink your ideas as other people raise new points and questions.

Please turn off all cell phones before coming to class. It is difficult for others to concentrate if cell phones are ringing. In general, please show respect and consideration for others in your class conduct.

All students are asked to think like educators: you should be concerned not only with your own learning but with that of others in the class. You may be asked to move out of your comfort zone, therefore, and talk, if you are accustomed to being silent or to withhold contributions at times, if you tend to talk a good deal. We do not expect everyone to talk the same amount; in principle, it is fine if some people talk more than others. However, if one or two people are dominating class discussion and/or silencing others, we may ask them to spend more time listening and less time talking. Conversely, if some students never talk, we may ask them to work on contributing more. We are looking for a balance in which all students have the opportunity to learn from one another, and this is only possible if everyone contributes at least a little and if no one dominates the discussion.

How you talk (and listen) is more important than how much you talk. Class contributions can be argumentative but should not be disrespectful, for example, and students can remind classmates of important points from the readings but should not hold forth with mini-lectures. Learning to make contributions that are engaging and involving for other students rather than self-indulgent or undisciplined is a key part of learning to teach; we will be taking into consideration how you participate in discussion, in evaluating class participation.
 


Required Reading

1) Mike Rose, Lives on the Boundary [available at the University Bookstore and at the reserve desk at the University Library]

2) George H. Wood, Schools that Work [available at the University Bookstore and on reserve at the University library]

3) Gene Adair, George Washington Carver: Botanist (New York: Chelsea House Pub., 1989).

4) Individual readings are available on paper reserve at the Marriott Library (first floor) or may be downloaded from the electronic reserves at http://webpac.lib.utah.edu/webpac-1.2-bin/DoReserve (search under Thompson, Audrey, 4111)
 

READING/LECTURE/DISCUSSION SCHEDULE:

Tues. 7 Jan.    Democracy and Education

Lecture/discussion and student interviews

I. Schools as Institutions

Thurs. 9 Jan.     A. The Environment of Schools
Reading:
Rose, Lives on the Boundary, 1-83
Video: Interview: Mike Rose and Bill Moyers

Tues. 14 Jan.     B. Texts and the Institutional Context
Reading:
Rose, Lives on the Boundary, 85-165

Thurs. 16 Jan.     C. Inclusion and/vs. Excellence
Reading:
Rose, Lives on the Boundary, 167-242

Tues. 21 Jan.     D. The Hidden Curriculum
Reading:
Anyon, “Social Class and School Knowledge”
Handout: Deconstructing yearbooks

Bring yearbooks to class for small group work

Thurs. 23 Jan.     E. Silencing Students
Readings:
Treesberg, “The Death of a ‘Strong Deaf’”
Davidson, “Marbella Sanchez: On Marginalization and Silencing”

Electronic Handout: Case study questions for “We Are Chauvinists” (see readings for next week)

for all links to electronic handouts, see http://www.pauahtun.org/4111.S03.html

Tues. 28 Jan.     F. Sexual Harassment
Readings:
Jones, “‘We Are Chauvinists’: Sexual Entitlement and Sexual Harassment in a High School”
Friend, “Choices, Not Closets: Heterosexism and Homophobia in Schools”

Case Study Process Drama Activities with Prof. Dave Dynak, Theater Dept.

Written assignment due (see electronic handout on case study from last session)

II. Gender, Race, and the Purposes of Public Education

Thurs. 30 Jan.     A. Gender and Education
Readings:
Houston, “Gender Freedom and the Subtleties of Sexist Education”
Gilligan, “Teaching Shakespeare’s Sister: Notes from the Underground of Female Adolescence”

Timeline question: What were some of the demands of the second wave of feminism?

Tues. 4 Feb.     B. Race and Racism in the Schools
Reading:
Kailin, “How White Teachers Perceive the Problem of Racism in Their Schools: A Case Study in ‘Liberal’ Lakeview”
Jervis, “‘How Come There Are No Brothers on That List?’ Hearing the Hard Questions All Children Ask”

Thurs. 6 Feb.     C. Teaching Students about Racism
Reading:
Kohl, “The Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott Revisited”

Written assignment due on Rosa Parks biography (see electronic handout)

Process drama

Video: Mighty Times: The Legacy of Rosa Parks

Timeline question: Who were three Civil Rights leaders other than Martin Luther King, Jr., and what were some of their contributions to the movement?

Tues. 11 Feb.     D. The “Irish Problem” and the Emergence of the Public Schools
Readings:
Ignatiev, “White Negroes and Smoked Irish”
Katz, Doucet, and Stern, “Early Industrial Capitalism: The Institutional Legacy”
Mann, “12th Annual Report [1848]”

Timeline question: Name two or three industrial and intellectual developments occurring in the first half of the 19th century, in the U.S.

Thurs. 13 Feb.     E. The Feminization and Professionalization of Teaching
Readings:
Brownson, “Decentralization: Alternative to Bureaucracy? Orestes Brownson in Opposition to Centralization, 1839”
Lerner, “The Lady and the Mill Girl: Changes in the Status of Women in the Age of Jackson, 1800-1840”

Timeline question: What were the demands of first-wave feminists?

Electronic handout: Midterm paper topics

Tues. 18 Feb.     F. An Education in Whiteness
Readings:
Perdue, “Southern Indians and the Cult of True Womanhood”
Wescott, “Educate to Americanize: Captain Pratt and Early Indian Education”

Timeline question: What political and economic factors may have entered into whites’ interest in converting and educating American Indians in the late 1700s and early 1800s? In the late 1800s?

Video: In the White Man’s Image

Thesis statements and brief, rough outlines due

Thurs. 20 Feb.     Class does not meet (but do read the following assignment)
Reading:
Adair, George Washington Carver: Botanist, pp. 11-67

Tues. 25 Feb.     G. Education for Segregation or Integration?
Readings:
Washington, “The Atlanta Exposition Address”
Du Bois, “Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others”
Adair, George Washington Carver: Botanist, pp. 69-77

Timeline question: What other issues and arguments about “race uplift” were circulating in the black community in the three decades after Reconstruction?

W. E. B. Du Bois (video clips)

Thurs. 27 Feb.     H. Colonizing the Mind
Readings:
Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negro [excerpts]
Adair, George Washington Carver: Botanist, pp. 79-105

Timeline question: What political and cultural changes did the Harlem Renaissance introduce?
 


III. Difference, Sameness, and Power

Tues. 4 March     A. Literacy and Power
No readings assigned; midterm papers are due at the beginning of class

Class meets for lecture/discussion and video deconstruction

Thurs. 6 March     B. Language and Identity
Readings:
Padden and Humphries, “Living in Others’ World”
Labov, “Academic Ignorance and Black Intelligence”

Video clips from an Oprah Winfrey show on B.E.V. and the PBS series, Childhood

Tues. 11 March     C. Deficit and Difference Theories
Readings:
Guthrie, “Psychometric Scientism”
Swisher and Deyhle, “The Styles of Learning Are Different but the Teaching Is Just the Same: Suggestions for Teachers of American Indian Youth”

Thurs. 13 March     D. Social Categories and Social Regulation
Readings:
Violas, “Progressive Social Philosophy: Charles Horton Cooley and Edward Alsworth Ross”
Martinez, “Mexican Americans and Whiteness”
O’Hanlon, “Interscholastic Athletics, 1900-1940: Shaping Citizens for Unequal Roles in the Modern Industrial State”

Timeline question: What were some of the major political and intellectual developments in 1900-1940?

Electronic handout: African-American Biography Project

(Bibliography of African-American Histories, Biographies, and Fictionalized Biographies for Children and Young Adults can be found on Audrey’s website or on reserve at the library)

Tues. 18 March     Spring Break: No classes

Thurs. 20 March     Spring Break: No classes

Tues. 25 March     E. Cultural Consciousness in Children’s Books
Readings:
Slapin, Seale, and Gonzales, “How to Tell the Difference: A Checklist”
Thompson, “Harriet Tubman in Pictures: Cultural Consciousness and the Art of Picture Books”

Thurs. 27 March     F. Race and Colorblindness in the Curriculum
Reading:
Anderson, “How We Learn about Race through History”

Project: Papers due and in-class small-group projects on children’s biographies


IV. Curriculum, Policy, and Pedagogy

Tues. 1 April     A. School Policies
Reading:
Gitlin, Buendía, Crosland, and Doumbia, “The Production of Margin and Center: Welcoming/Unwelcoming of Immigrant Students”

Thurs. 3 April     B. Transmittal Pedagogy, Part I
Reading:
Delpit, “The Silenced Dialogue: Power and Pedagogy in Educating Other People’s Children”

Tues. 8 April     C. Transmittal Pedagogy, Part II
Readings:
Van Doren, “Education for All”
McNeil, “Defensive Teaching and Classroom Control”

Thurs. 10 April     D. Nurturance Pedagogy, Part I
Readings:
Hirsch, “‘I Can’t Be like Pippi ’Cause I’m Afraid to Live Alone’: Third Graders’ Response to Novels”
Manzo, “Flap over ‘Nappy Hair’ Book Leads to Teacher’s Transfer”

Electronic handout: Final paper topics

Tues. 15 April     E. Nurturance Pedagogy, Part II
Readings:
Wood, Schools that Work, xiii-119

Handout: Deconstructing textbooks

Bring textbooks to class for small-group deconstruction

Thurs. 17 April     F. Craft Pedagogy, Part I
Readings:
Wigginton, “Some Overarching Truths”
Wood, Schools that Work, 120-164

Tues. 22 April     G. Craft Pedagogy, Part II
Readings:
Wood, Schools that Work, 165-266

Video: Mahalia Jackson Elementary School/2nd Grade, Harlem, New York

Tues. 29 April     No in-class exam; final papers due by 4:30 p.m.


List of Course Readings

James D. Anderson, “How We Learn about Race through History,” in Learning History in America: Schools, Cultures, and Politics, ed. Lloyd Kramer, Donald Reid, and William L. Barney (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1994), 87-106.

Jean Anyon, “Social Class and School Knowledge,” Curriculum Inquiry 11, no. 1 (1981): 3-42.

Orestes Brownson, “Decentralization: Alternative to Bureaucracy? Orestes Brownson in Opposition to Centralization, 1839,” in School Reform: Past and Present, ed. Michael B. Katz (Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1971), 277-87.

Ann Locke Davidson, “Marbella Sanchez: On Marginalization and Silencing,” in Beyond Black and White: New Faces and Voices in U. S. Schools, ed. Maxine Seller and Lois Weis (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997), 15-44.

Lisa D. Delpit, “The Silenced Dialogue: Power and Pedagogy in Educating Other People’s Children,” Harvard Educational Review 58, no.3 (August 1988): 280-98.

W. E. B. Du Bois, “Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others,” in The Souls of Black Folk (New York: Vintage/Library of America, 1990 [1903]), 36-48.

Richard A. Friend, “Choices, Not Closets: Heterosexism and Homophobia in Schools,” in Beyond Silenced Voices: Class, Race, and Gender in United States Schools, ed. Lois Weis and Michelle Fine (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1993), 209-35.

Carol Gilligan, “Teaching Shakespeare’s Sister: Notes from the Underground of Female Adolescence,” in Making Connections: The Relational Worlds of Adolescent Girls at Emma Willard School, ed. Carol Gilligan, Nona P. Lyons, and Trudy J. Hanmer (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990), 6-29.

Andrew Gitlin, Ed Buendía, Kristen Crosland, and Fodé Doumbia, “The Production of Margin and Center: Welcoming/Unwelcoming of Immigrant Students,” manuscript.

Robert V. Guthrie, “Psychometric Scientism,” in Even the Rat Was White: A Historical View of Psychology, 2nd ed. (Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1998), 55-87.

Karen Hirsch, “‘I Can’t Be like Pippi ’Cause I’m Afraid to Live Alone’: Third Graders’ Response to Novels,” in Reader Response in Elementary Classrooms: Quest and Discovery, ed. Nicholas J. Karolides (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc., 1997), 137-54.

Barbara Houston, “Gender Freedom and the Subtleties of Sexist Education,” Educational Theory 35, no. 4 (Fall 1985): 359-69.

Noel Ignatiev, “White Negroes and Smoked Irish,” in How the Irish Became White (New York: Routledge, 1995), 34-59.

Kathe Jervis, “‘How Come There Are No Brothers on That List?’ Hearing the Hard Questions All Children Ask,” Harvard Educational Review 66, no. 3 (Fall 1996): 546-76.

Karen Jones, “‘We Are Chauvinists’: Sexual Entitlement and Sexual Harassment in a High School,” in Inclusive Education: A Casebook and Readings for Prospective and Practicing Teachers, ed. Suzanne E. Wade (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000), 159-66.

Julie Kailin, “How White Teachers Perceive the Problem of Racism in Their Schools: A Case Study in ‘Liberal’ Lakeview,” Teachers College Record 100, no. 4 (Summer 1999): 724-50.

Michael B. Katz, Michael J. Doucet, and Mark J. Stern, “Early Industrial Capitalism: The Institutional Legacy,” in The Social Organization of Early Industrial Capitalism (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1982), 349-91.

Herbert Kohl, “The Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott Revisited,” in Should We Burn Babar? Essays on Children’s Literature and the Power of Stories (New York: The New Press, 1995), 30-56.

William Labov, “Academic Ignorance and Black Intelligence,” The Atlantic 229, no. 6 (June 1972): 59-67.

Gerda Lerner, “The Lady and the Mill Girl: Changes in the Status of Women in the Age of Jackson, 1800-1840,” in A Heritage of Her Own: Toward a New Social History of American Women, ed. Nancy F. Cott and Elizabeth H. Peck (New York: Touchstone/Simon & Schuster, 1979), 182-96.

Horace Mann, “12th Annual Report [1848],” in The Republic and the School, ed. Lawrence Cremin (New York: Teachers College Press, 1957), 79-112.

Kathleen Kennedy Manzo, “Flap over ‘Nappy Hair’ Book Leads to Teacher’s Transfer,” Education Week (December 19, 1998): 5.

George A. Martinez, “Mexican Americans and Whiteness,” in The Latino/a Condition: A Critical Reader, ed. Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic (New York: New York University Press, 1998), 175-79.

Linda McNeil, “Defensive Teaching and Classroom Control,” in Ideology and Practice in Schooling, ed. Michael W. Apple and Lois Weis (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1983), 114-42.

Timothy O’Hanlon, “Interscholastic Athletics, 1900-1940: Shaping Citizens for Unequal Roles in the Modern Industrial State,” Educational Theory 30, no. 2 (Spring 1980): 89-103.

Carol Padden and Tom Humphries, “Living in Others’ World,” in Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988), 56-70.

Theda Perdue, “Southern Indians and the Cult of True Womanhood,” in The Web of Southern Social Relations: Women, Family, and Education, ed. Walter J. Fraser, Jr., R. Frank Saunders, Jr., and Jon L. Wakelyn (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1985), 35-51.

Mike Rose, Lives on the Boundary: A Moving Account of the Struggles and Achievements of America’s Educational Underclass (New York: Penguin, 1989).

Beverly Slapin, Doris Seale, and Rosemary Gonzales, “How to Tell the Difference: A Checklist,” in Through Indian Eyes: The Native Experience in Books for Children, 3rd ed., ed. Beverly Slapin and Doris Seale (Philadelphia: New Society Publishers, 1992), 241-67.

Karen Swisher and Donna Deyhle, “The Styles of Learning Are Different but the Teaching Is Just the Same: Suggestions for Teachers of American Indian Youth,” Journal of American Indian Education (August 1989): 1-14.

Audrey Thompson, “Harriet Tubman in Pictures: Cultural Consciousness and the Art of Picture Books,” The Lion and the Unicorn 25, no. 1 (January 2001): 81-114.

Judith Treesberg, “The Death of a ‘Strong Deaf’,” The Nation 252, no. 5 (February 11, 1991): 154-58.

Mark Van Doren, “Education for All,” in Liberal Education (Boston: Beacon Press, 1943/1960), 28-42.

Paul C. Violas, “Progressive Social Philosophy: Charles Horton Cooley and Edward Alsworth Ross,” in The Roots of Crisis: American Education in the Twentieth Century, ed. Clarence J. Karier, Paul C. Violas, and Joel Spring (Chicago: Rand McNally, 1973), 40-65.

Booker T. Washington, “The Atlanta Exposition Address,” in Up from Slavery (New York: Magnum Books, 1901/1968), 217-36.

Siobhan Maureen Wescott, “Educate to Americanize: Captain Pratt and Early Indian Education,” Change 23, no. 2 (March/April 1991): 45-46.

Eliot Wigginton, “Some Overarching Truths,” in Sometimes a Shining Moment: The Foxfire Experience: Twenty Years Teaching in a High School Classroom (Garden City, NY: Anchor, 1985/1986), 199-286.

John S. Wills, “Who Needs Multicultural Education? White Students, U.S. History, and the Construction of a Usable Past,” Anthropology and Education Quarterly 27, no. 3 (September 1996): 365-89.

George H. Wood, Schools that Work: America’s Most Innovative Public Education Programs (New York: Plume, 1993).

Carter Godwin Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negro (Washington, DC: The Associated Publishers, 1933/1972).
 
 
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